WORSHIP MUSIC | SECOND SUNDAY OF EASTER

On this Second Sunday of Easter, April 11, Music Director Hyosang Park performs a handbell solo, and Pianist Julia Hanna treats us to beautiful classical music pieces.   Our hymns include “Spirit Of God” and “Open My Eyes, That I May See,” popular hymns for this season. “Savior, Like A Shepherd Lead Us, a favorite hymn of mine,” fittingly brings this service to its close. 

 The hymn, “Savior, Like A Shepherd Lead Us,” was first published by its composer Dorothy Ann Thrupp in a collection of songs titled “Hymns For The Young,” and sung to the music “Bradbury” by William B. Bradbury. It is a prayer  based on Psalm 23, with pleas for tender care from lost, needy children. The Shepherd responds with love. We are his lambs, and He, our Shepherd continues to lead us.

Video:  “Savior, Like A Shepherd Lead Us,”      

In this Easter season, we celebrate new life in Christ, who triumphed over death and is alive again. Come, let us worship in the light of his teachings and his healing mercies, and come before his presence with music and hymns.  Pastor Rebekah Anderson is preaching on “The Syrophoenician Woman’s Faith,” as recorded in the Scripture Mark 7:24-30.  

Click here to join us in this worship service and share in songs and music.

[Videos credit: YouTube]  [Photo credit: PUMC Library]

GOOD FRIDAY WORSHIP MUSIC

   🎵🎼🎺Were you there when they crucified my Lord? 🎼🎷🎵

On  Good Friday   we commemorate the crucifixion of Jesus and his death at CalvaryThis Good Friday service features a special performance by our Virtual Handbell choir performing A. Sherman’s “What Wondrous Love Is This.” Because the Cross represents the way Jesus died, we also sing these three hymns, “Jesus Keep Me Near The Cross,” “Beneath The Cross Of Jesus,” and “When I Survey The Wondrous Cross.” On this day, as we enter more deeply into the passion of Jesus, we allow Jesus’ passionate love for us to enter our hearts, minds, bodies, and souls more deeply as well. May our music inspire us to hold firm to our faith and rejoice that Jesus’ death paid the price for our sin. 

Video: “When I Survey The Wondrous Cross”

Isaac Watts, a Christian minister, and hymn writer, wrote the hymn “When I Survey The Wondrous Cross” in 1707 based on the Crucifixion. Watts is credited with some 750 hymns. Sung to the tune ‘Rockingham,’ it is used for many years by the BBC to introduce its 7am broadcast on Good Friday

Video: “Jesus Keeps Me Near The Cross”

 Fanny Crosby wrote the hymn “Jesus Keeps Me Near The Cross, published in 1869.  William Howard Doane composed the tune before Crosby wrote the lyrics. The hymn is based on Galatians 6:14. This is one of Crosby’s best-known hymns and has been translated into several languages, including Russian, German, Spanish, and Haitian Creole.


Click here to join us in this Tenebrae worship service based on the Seven Last Words from the Cross and share in songs and music.

[Videos credit: YouTube] [Image credit: Google Images]  [Photo credit: PUMC Library]

 

PALM SUNDAY | SING HOSANNA TO OUR KING!

  🎼🎻🎺 HOSANNA, LOUD HOSANNA! 🎸🎷🎵

On Palm Sunday, we celebrate Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem as he begins his journey to the Cross, riding on in majesty to die. Our Palm Sunday worship will feature special performances by all choirs and our pianist:

  • The Children’s and Youth choirs will sing the Introit “Antiphonal Hosanna” by G. Alan Smith.
  • The Virtual Chancel choir will sing “Hosanna to the Son of David” by B. Gesius.
  • The Virtual Handbell choir will perform “There is a Balm in Gilead” by Erik Whitehill during the Offertory.
  • Pianist Julia Hanna will play Blumenfeld’s “Prélude #9” and Joaquín Turina’s “Pequeña danza from Jardín de niños” favorite classical music of PUMC. We are grateful to all our musicians for lifting us up with such beautiful music.  

On this first day of Holy Week, as we sing “Hosanna, Loud Hosanna,” we join the crowds who went to meet Jesus, waving palm branches and spreading them along his way, as Jesus rode on a donkey into Jerusalem.

Video    “Hosanna, Loud Hosanna” 

Video:  Hosanna in the Highest 

Click here to join us as we wave our palms and share in songs, music, prayer, listen to scripture, John 3:1-21, and to Pastor Jenny’s Sermon, “Repairing the Brokenness.”


If you’re looking for inspiration: Come worship with us at PUMC. If you suffer or grieve, you will find healing here. If you are burdened with sin, you will find forgiveness here. If you are exhausted, you will find rest here. There is a place for you here in our beloved PUMC community, where you will have the love and support of others.

[Video Source: YouTube] [Photo courtesy of PUMC]

WORSHIP MUSIC | THIRD SUNDAY OF LENT

🎼🎶“There’s a wideness in God’s mercy, like the wideness of the sea.
There’s a kindness in God’s justice, which is more than liberty.”🎼🎶

On this Third Sunday of Lent, which is also Communion Sunday, we will have a special music performance featuring our Chancel Choir singing “Come Find Forgiveness and Love” by Don Besig.

Our hymns today draw on the theme that Jesus, the good shepherd, will always look after his sheep, even bringing back the lost ones. They also remind us of God’s love, justice, and mercy for all. As we reflect on God’s love and pardon for lost sinners in Bible times, we are filled with hope and joy that if we repent when we sin, God can forgive us too. The scripture this week comes from Luke 15:11-32 and tells the story of the Prodigal Son. Intern Hyelim Yoon will preach a sermon on the topic: “Broken Things: Broken From God.”

As we journey with Jesus during Lent and witness his suffering, we learn to manage our fear and anxiety and the difficulties we encounter and trust our Lord and Savior.

Video “The King of Love My Shepherd Is” 

“Sir Henry W. Baker,  editor-in-chief of Hymns Ancient and Modern, wrote the text of “The King Of Love My Shepherd Is” in 1868 based on the Welsh version of  Psalm 23. He draws connection between this well-known psalm and other New Testament images on the theme of the Good Shepherd saying that even though we do not always deserve his kindness, and we sometimes act foolishly, God loves us and his goodness towards us never fails. The hymn reflects on Jesus as a shepherd leading his followers from evil and despair towards salvation.” {Wiki}  Sir Henry  is said to have spoken  stanza three of this hymn as his last words before dying. This hymn is sung to four different tunes including  DOMINUS REGIT ME (Dykes)

Video “There’s a Wideness in God’s Mercy” 

“The author of “There’s a Wideness in God’s Mercy” is Frederick William Faber. He wrote this hymn in 1862 to the tune of WELLESLEY  by Lizzie Tourjee. Tourjee wrote this tune for her school’s graduation ceremony. Influenced by the rituals and traditions of Rome, Faber, an English clergy,  converted from the Anglican Church to Roman Catholicism in the 19th century. The theme of this hymn is based on the premise and paradox that a sovereign ruler, unlike earthly rulers demonstrates welcome, kindness, grace and mercy. All we need to do is have a simple faith that “rest[s] upon God’s word.” Faber wrote many widely known hymns such as “My God, how wonderful thou art,” and “Hark, hark, my soul, angelic songs are swelling.” {Wiki}

Are you sick, struggling with sin, exhausted, anxious about anything? Come worship with us, and you will find healing, forgiveness, rest, and peace here at PUMC. If you feel broken, remember, God loves you regardless of how you feel. Let us, therefore, lift our voices together in song to our God and King.

Click here  to join us as we share in songs, prayer, music, scripture, and listen to Hyelim Yoon’s Sermon.

[Images Source: Google Images] [Videos Source: YouTube]

 

 

Worship Music | First Sunday Of Lent

🎼🎶It’s me, it’s me, O Lord,  Standin’ in the need of prayer;
It’s me, it’s me, O Lord,  Standin’ in the need of prayer.🎼🎶

On this First Sunday of Lent, the Children’s Choir will give an impressive performance of “These Times Call for a Vision” by Hal Hopson. Our hymns and music today remind us of God’s faithfulness to Christians in Bible times and give us hope and joy that He can save us too. 

These two are my favorite hymns:

 “Guide Me, O Thou Great Jehovah.” The author of this famous hymn written in 1745 in Welsh, is William Williams. Peter Williams translated it into English in 1771.  William expressed the many hardships he experienced as a traveling minister. He used rich biblical references, especially from the Book of Exodus, to show God’s guidance through struggle. It is a favorite hymn among Christians and has carried us through difficult times and helped us overcome life’s struggles. We believe that this God who provided “Manna” – Bread of Heaven – to the Israelites as they wandered for forty years in the desert will still provide for us. The hymn played an essential part at Princess Diana of Wales’s funeral in 1997 and Prince William and Catherine Middleton’s royal wedding in 2011. 

Video  “Guide Me O Thou Great Jehovah” | HLA Wilderness Escape VBS 

“It’s Me; It’s Me, O Lord” is an African American spiritual. The author and composer are unknown. Its message is: ‘I need prayer!’ The line, ‘Standing in the Need,’ states that we all need others to pray for us, as much as we need to pray. The theme of this gospel song is humility and honesty. The song also refers to the prayer of the publican tax collector that Jesus spoke of in Luke 18:4. “For all those who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted.” Let us, therefore, pray for one another.”

             Video  “It’s Me; Its Me, O Lord”  |  The Beyond the Walls Choir


As we journey with Jesus during Lent and witness his suffering, we learn to manage our fear and anxiety and the difficulties we encounter. We have chosen our worship music to relate to our scripture from Romans 5:12-15 and Pastor Jenny’s sermon on the theme “Broken Things: Sin,” reminding us that Jesus died for our sins.

Are you sick, struggling with sin, exhausted, anxious about anything? Come worship with us, and you will find healing, forgiveness, rest, and peace here at PUMC. If you feel broken, remember, God loves you regardless of how you feel. Let us, therefore, lift our voices together in song to our God and King. 

Click here  to join us as we share in songs, prayer, music, scripture, and listen to Pastor Jenny’s Sermon.

[Images Source: Google Images]  

Worship Music for Ash Wednesday

🎼🎶 Sunday’s palms are Wednesday’s ashes as another Lent begins; Thus we kneel before the Maker in contrition for our sins.We have marred baptismal pledges, in rebellion gone astray;Now returning, seek forgiveness; grant us pardon, God, this day! 🎼🎶 

As we begin the holy season of Lent,  Rev. Jenny Smith Walz will lead a Virtual Ash Wednesday service this evening on Facebook Livestream and our website. Lent is a season of reflection, repentance, forgiveness, and healing and a time to show more love for our brothers and sisters.  Our Virtual Quartet featuring Jenni Collins, Leslie Levey, Stephen Offer, and Jeff Ransom will perform “Create In Me A Clean Heart” by Carl MuellerWe will sing the hymn “Sunday’s Palms Are Wednesday’s Ashes As Another Lent Begins.” Our other songs are “Turn Your Eyes Upon Jesus”and “When We Are Living (Somos Del Senor)”in English and Spanish. Music Director Hyosang Park will play “The King of Love My Shepherd Is” and “My Shepherd Will Supply My Need.” The music and hymns relate to our scripture passage Isaiah 58:5-14 and correspond to Pastor Jenny’s Meditation. This year, we are doing Ash Wednesday differently. We mix our own ashes at home and make the sign of the cross on our forehead.  Here is a video tutorial from Pastor Jenny with tips about making a ‘just-right’ ash mixture. You can also come to the church today, between 9am and 6pm, for quiet prayer and self imposition of ashes.

One of my favorite hymns, “Sunday’s Palms Are Wednesday’s Ashes,” by British-born hymn-writer Rae E. Whitney sets the tone for the holy season of Lent. Whitney reminds us that the Palm Sunday processional palms that signal the beginning of Holy Week are saved and burned for the next Ash Wednesday. These charred palms are imprinted as a cross on our forehead as a witness to our faith. The hymn refers to our failure to keep our baptismal vows and is asking God for forgiveness. It also talks about our inability to love our neighbor and thus asking God to create a pure heart in us.                                                            

Are you sick, struggling with sin, exhausted, anxious about anything? Come worship with us, and you will find healing, forgiveness, rest, and peace here at PUMC. If you feel broken, remember, God loves you regardless of how you feel. Let us, therefore, lift our voices together in song to our God and King. 

Click here to join us as we share in songs, prayer, music, scripture, and listen to Pastor Jenny’s Meditation. 

[Images Source: Google Images]  

HYMNS: “God Made From One Blood,” “Panis angelicus,” and “When God Restored Our Common Life”

COME SING WITH US

We Want to Worship With You

Thomas H. Troeger is the author of “God Made From One Blood.”  To watch a YouTube video of this hymn, click here

“Panis angelicus” (Latin for “Bread of Angels” or “Angelic Bread”) is the penultimate strophe of the hymn “Sacris solemniis” written by Saint Thomas Aquinas for the feast of Corpus Christi. Most famously, in 1872 César Franck set this strophe for tenor voice, harp, cello, and organ, and incorporated it into his Messe à trois voix. {Wiki}. To watch a YouTube video of this hymn, click here

“When God Restored Our Common Life” was written by Ruth C. DuckTo watch a YouTube video of this hymn, click here

To follow our worship service on FaceBook and sing with us, click here