Worship Music | First Sunday Of Lent

🎼🎶It’s me, it’s me, O Lord,  Standin’ in the need of prayer;
It’s me, it’s me, O Lord,  Standin’ in the need of prayer.🎼🎶

On this First Sunday of Lent, the Children’s Choir will give an impressive performance of “These Times Call for a Vision” by Hal Hopson. Our hymns and music today remind us of God’s faithfulness to Christians in Bible times and give us hope and joy that He can save us too. 

These two are my favorite hymns:

 “Guide Me, O Thou Great Jehovah.” The author of this famous hymn written in 1745 in Welsh, is William Williams. Peter Williams translated it into English in 1771.  William expressed the many hardships he experienced as a traveling minister. He used rich biblical references, especially from the Book of Exodus, to show God’s guidance through struggle. It is a favorite hymn among Christians and has carried us through difficult times and helped us overcome life’s struggles. We believe that this God who provided “Manna” – Bread of Heaven – to the Israelites as they wandered for forty years in the desert will still provide for us. The hymn played an essential part at Princess Diana of Wales’s funeral in 1997 and Prince William and Catherine Middleton’s royal wedding in 2011. 

Video  “Guide Me O Thou Great Jehovah” | HLA Wilderness Escape VBS 

“It’s Me; It’s Me, O Lord” is an African American spiritual. The author and composer are unknown. Its message is: ‘I need prayer!’ The line, ‘Standing in the Need,’ states that we all need others to pray for us, as much as we need to pray. The theme of this gospel song is humility and honesty. The song also refers to the prayer of the publican tax collector that Jesus spoke of in Luke 18:4. “For all those who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted.” Let us, therefore, pray for one another.”

             Video  “It’s Me; Its Me, O Lord”  |  The Beyond the Walls Choir


As we journey with Jesus during Lent and witness his suffering, we learn to manage our fear and anxiety and the difficulties we encounter. We have chosen our worship music to relate to our scripture from Romans 5:12-15 and Pastor Jenny’s sermon on the theme “Broken Things: Sin,” reminding us that Jesus died for our sins.

Are you sick, struggling with sin, exhausted, anxious about anything? Come worship with us, and you will find healing, forgiveness, rest, and peace here at PUMC. If you feel broken, remember, God loves you regardless of how you feel. Let us, therefore, lift our voices together in song to our God and King. 

Click here  to join us as we share in songs, prayer, music, scripture, and listen to Pastor Jenny’s Sermon.

[Images Source: Google Images]  

Worship Music for Ash Wednesday

🎼🎶 Sunday’s palms are Wednesday’s ashes as another Lent begins; Thus we kneel before the Maker in contrition for our sins.We have marred baptismal pledges, in rebellion gone astray;Now returning, seek forgiveness; grant us pardon, God, this day! 🎼🎶 

As we begin the holy season of Lent,  Rev. Jenny Smith Walz will lead a Virtual Ash Wednesday service this evening on Facebook Livestream and our website. Lent is a season of reflection, repentance, forgiveness, and healing and a time to show more love for our brothers and sisters.  Our Virtual Quartet featuring Jenni Collins, Leslie Levey, Stephen Offer, and Jeff Ransom will perform “Create In Me A Clean Heart” by Carl MuellerWe will sing the hymn “Sunday’s Palms Are Wednesday’s Ashes As Another Lent Begins.” Our other songs are “Turn Your Eyes Upon Jesus”and “When We Are Living (Somos Del Senor)”in English and Spanish. Music Director Hyosang Park will play “The King of Love My Shepherd Is” and “My Shepherd Will Supply My Need.” The music and hymns relate to our scripture passage Isaiah 58:5-14 and correspond to Pastor Jenny’s Meditation. This year, we are doing Ash Wednesday differently. We mix our own ashes at home and make the sign of the cross on our forehead.  Here is a video tutorial from Pastor Jenny with tips about making a ‘just-right’ ash mixture. You can also come to the church today, between 9am and 6pm, for quiet prayer and self imposition of ashes.

One of my favorite hymns, “Sunday’s Palms Are Wednesday’s Ashes,” by British-born hymn-writer Rae E. Whitney sets the tone for the holy season of Lent. Whitney reminds us that the Palm Sunday processional palms that signal the beginning of Holy Week are saved and burned for the next Ash Wednesday. These charred palms are imprinted as a cross on our forehead as a witness to our faith. The hymn refers to our failure to keep our baptismal vows and is asking God for forgiveness. It also talks about our inability to love our neighbor and thus asking God to create a pure heart in us.                                                            

Are you sick, struggling with sin, exhausted, anxious about anything? Come worship with us, and you will find healing, forgiveness, rest, and peace here at PUMC. If you feel broken, remember, God loves you regardless of how you feel. Let us, therefore, lift our voices together in song to our God and King. 

Click here to join us as we share in songs, prayer, music, scripture, and listen to Pastor Jenny’s Meditation. 

[Images Source: Google Images]  

HYMNS: “God Made From One Blood,” “Panis angelicus,” and “When God Restored Our Common Life”

COME SING WITH US

We Want to Worship With You

Thomas H. Troeger is the author of “God Made From One Blood.”  To watch a YouTube video of this hymn, click here

“Panis angelicus” (Latin for “Bread of Angels” or “Angelic Bread”) is the penultimate strophe of the hymn “Sacris solemniis” written by Saint Thomas Aquinas for the feast of Corpus Christi. Most famously, in 1872 César Franck set this strophe for tenor voice, harp, cello, and organ, and incorporated it into his Messe à trois voix. {Wiki}. To watch a YouTube video of this hymn, click here

“When God Restored Our Common Life” was written by Ruth C. DuckTo watch a YouTube video of this hymn, click here

To follow our worship service on FaceBook and sing with us, click here