Community Dinner a Success

PUMC Cornerstone Community Kitchen Grand Opening
L-R Howard Roundtree, Dennis Micai, Pastor Jana Purkis-Brash, and Larry Apperson

The Princeton Cornerstone Community Kitchen opened its doors on June 6th for the first time. TASK Executive Director Dennis Micai was on hand, as well as Howard Roundtree of TASK and the Crisis Ministry who will deliver the food.

Princeton Cornerstone Community Kitchen Breakfast BagRound tables, great for conversation, were set with tablecloths and flowers. 46 guests were served a nutritious meal, and kids were given a bag of breakfast treats for the next morning’s meal.

The servers were very friendly. People were seated, and the meals were given with a smile, and a bit of conversation. After they left, servers quickly cleaned and set-up for the next diners.

The group I sat with kept me intrigued and entertained the entire meal. It was nice to meet so many people who had interesting stories to share.

When families dine together, kids do better physically, socially and academically. When singles and seniors dine with others, it gives them the opportunity to eat a more balanced meal and have stimulating conversation.

Princeton Cornerstone Community Kitchen Meal

Overall, it’s a win-win situation for everyone who comes. And best of all, it’s absolutely FREE! I encourage you to join us for dinner on Wednesdays 5-6:30 PM, and please spread the word.

Cornerstone Community Kitchen, Beginning June 6th

Cornerstone Community Kitchen  is the name of our new Wednesday evening dinner that will begin June 6th.  On that Wednesday we will begin offering a free nourishing meal in a warm and friendly atmosphere to all who come. Those who come will be guaranteed a warm greeting, someone to talk with if they like, and a satisfying meal.  We hope to nourish body and soul as we build community around the table. Dinner will be served will be from 5 till 6:30 PM in the Sanford Davis room. Teams are being organized to serve one Wednesday each month. If you have an interest in being part of this opportunity the Lord has given us here at PUMC, contact the church office.  

St. George and the Dragon Window

Our 105-year-old building has a spectacular stained glass window from the renowned Tiffany Studio of New York City. How did PUMC acquire a window with such an unusual subject?

It was the gift of the family of William Edward “Eddie” Durrell, a Methodist preacher’s son who – while he attended Princeton University – made PUMC his church home. Eddie graduated in 1889 and two years later met an untimely death in Rome, perhaps because of an aneurism. His father (Reverend Edward Hicks Durrell, who had invested in cranbury bogs in South Jersey) and his brothers — grateful for what the church had offered Eddie – commissioned the window symbolizing the triumph of good conquering evil.

Most images show St. George on a horse in the act of spearing the dragon. This memorial window shows an athletic young man, sword sheathed, as if to say “the battle is over, he fought the good fight, he conquered evil.”

PUMC has many stained glass treasures, including the Corson Chapel windows and the “Let the children come to me” mural in the Sanford Davis room.  In the sanctuary, our windows of the four Gospel writers  can also be found in the cathedral in Cologne Germany. The windows with abstract and symbolic designs are beautiful.

The St. George window, by the studio of Louis Comfort Tiffany, is the most valuable of our treasures. As Pam Hersh said in her column, it is ‘a spectacular piece of art in a surprising space.” Tiffany revolutionized stained glass art. While the Europeans fired paint directly on the glass, effectively dulling its natural transparency, Tiffany managed to create vivid color in the glass itself, and he etched details with acid instead of using paint. He layered multiple panels to create unparalleled clarity, and the windows shimmered on both sides.

Tiffany also redefined the use of leading. Traditionally, it was purely functional and thought of as little more than support for the glass. As a result, the lead tended to distract from, rather than enhance, the artistic vision. That is until Tiffany developed new techniques that allowed the metal to become an integral part of the design, and the once clunky lead lines were transformed into elaborate outlines for things like tree branches and butterfly wings — or, in this instance, cathedral windows.

The only other Tiffany windows in Princeton are on campus at Alexander Hall and Jadwin Hall. The best view of “Saint George and the Dragon” is from the back pew of the balcony. Look for the iridescent scales on the dragon (Tiffany patented that method as @Favrile), and also note the Tiffany signature on the right.

Source: Ruth Woodward in A Journey of Faith for One Hundred Fifty Years: A History of Princeton United Methodist Church and Elizabeth E. Evitts, Baltimore Magazine.